February 16, 2017 lyukum

Ramen: Creamy Chicken Stock | Tori Paitan | 鶏ガラパイタン

Tori Paitan Ramen

The Ultimate Chicken Stock for Ramen

Creamy chicken stock for ramen is now my number two favorite after tonkotsu. Torikotsu uses the same technique but requires less time and efforts to make it than tonkotsu — it is much easier to gelatinise chicken cartilage and connective tissues and extract flavors from less dense chicken bones. Most of the myoglobin is neutralized during the fist step of soaking chicken in cold water. To make it efficient, chop chicken wings and legs to smaller, 1-2″ pieces to expose bones marrow. As a result, there is significantly less scum to skim during the second step. Just like for tonkotsu, it is essential to remove the foam that appears, but keep the chicken fat and emulsify it into the creamy stock later, during the rapid boiling. Pressure cookers are very helpful and streamline the last stage of making chicken paitan even more if you are working on just a few portions. For the recipe below, use a 10-quart stock pot.

To make 4 quarts of chicken stock I used about 9 pounds of chicken parts. Originally, it’s a combination of whole chicken, chicken wings, and chicken feet. In the U.S. chicken feet are only available in Asian markets, which are in my case far away. I was curious whether I can make a decent chicken paitan (see Recipe Notes to learn about this term) by replacing the feet with more wings. The answer is yes, absolutely — 3lb pounds of drumsticks and 6lb of wings do the trick.

Tori Paitan (Torikotsu) Ramen

Tori Paitan (Torikotsu) Ramen

Tori Paitan (Torikotsu) Ramen

Tori Paitan (Torikotsu) Ramen

Tare

Tare (see Recipe Notes to learn about this term) is the ramen’s seasoning and defines the “type” of ramen. It can be simple or complex, combined or precooked, based on, but not limited to, one of three ingredients — shio (salt), shoyu (soy), or miso. I made a simple, mixed right in the bowl tare based on miso, aiming for bold umami flavors without changing the color of the stock. My version of tare is one of many, feel free to experiment with your favorite flavors.

Creamy Chicken Stock for Ramen | Tori Paitan | 鶏ガラパイタン
Tori Paitan Ramen
Print Recipe
Prep Time 1hour
Cook Time 4hours
Passive Time 16hours
Servings quarts
Tori Paitan Ramen
Print Recipe
Prep Time 1hour
Cook Time 4hours
Passive Time 16hours
Servings quarts
Ingredients
Units:
for stock
for tare (per 1 bowl)
Ingredients
Units:
for stock
for tare (per 1 bowl)
Instructions
  1. Fill a large bowl with cold water. Prepare a heavy cleaver and thick wooden cutting board to cut through meat and bones with ease.
  2. Chop the chicken parts and submerge them into cold water to soak refrigerated for 6-8 hours.
  3. Strain colored water.
  4. Wash chicken pieces under running cold water.
  5. Transfer clean chicken pieces into a stock pot and cover with cold water 4" on top. Place over high heat, cover with a lid to bring to boiling. Reduce heat to medium and skim the foamy skum. Turn the heat to medium-high to make it boiling again. Keep boiling for an hour.
  6. Meanwhile, prepare aromatics. Peel ginger and slice it 1/4" thick. Peel garlic. Peel and quarter onion. Peel carrot and chop it to large pieces. Wash and prepare white ends of scallions.
  7. Place a skillet with avocado oil over medium-high heat. When oil starts smoking, add onions, garlic, and ginger and caramelize them without burning.
  8. After the first hour of cooking the stock, add caramelized vegetables and scallions. Continue boiling for another two hours.
  9. After the first three hours of boiling, the stock becomes thick and creamy. Remove and discard scallions. Turn heat to high for rapid boiling for the last half an hour. This step will emulsify the chicken fat collected on the top.
  10. Strain the stock and squeeze more from the chicken solids. To emulsify chicken fat even better, use a blender. Then refrigerate or freeze, portioned.
to make tare
  1. Measure miso paste, konbu cha powder, hot chili sesame oil, and red yuzu into each bowl.
  2. Add 1/4 hot chicken stock and combine all ingredients well.
Recipe Notes

Ramen 101.2: Soup Basics—Pork and Chicken
Soup Categories: Paitan and Chintan

"A fundamental point about ramen soups is that they can be loosely divided into two main categories. Paitan (白湯) (meaning “white soup”) is a thick, cloudy soup. Chintan (清湯) (meaning “clear soup”) is clear, exactly as the name implies.

"As an example, tonkotsu ramens are almost always paitans. These soups are thick and creamy. They're full of fats and collagens extracted from pork bone marrow and cartilage. The fats provide tons of flavor, while both add body to the soup. If you cool a thick tonkotsu broth, it will rapidly solidify. But you can make chicken paitans, too. These toripaitan ramens have been ascendant in popularity in Japan over the past decade. Although the Japanese tonkotsu boom ended around the time the toripaitan boom began, tonkotsu ramen is still hot in the U.S. Using chicken feet is a key aspect of toripaitan: they are a great source of collagen and soup body."

Ramen 101.3 - Tare

Types of Ramen by Kobi's Kitchen
"Special Ramen Styles
[...]The other type of nouveau ramen I really like is Torikotsu Ramen. The stock of this type of ramen is made in a way similar to Tonkotsu but using chicken instead. After a long boiling time the resulting soup is similarly milky, heavy with gelatine and strong in meat flavour. This distinguishes it from the Hakodate style soup which is also made from chicken, but is clear. Torikotsu is typically topped with things like fried shallots, cabbage, scallion and perhaps a wedge of lemon. In some cases even the accompanying Chashu can be made from chicken as well. To try this type of less-common ramen, may I suggest a small Ramen chain in the Yokohama area called Matsuichiya."

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Comments (12)

  1. Tonya

    Hi!

    Thank you for this recipe it was really awesome!!!
    I’m from Israel where they do not make or know how to make ramen at all,
    and your recipe really helped me get the closest experience to the ramen I’ve had in the states!!

    I just have one question – There was A LOT of meat leftovers after draining the pot,
    what did you do with it?

    • lyukum

      Hi, Tonya!
      Thank you for your feedback!

      The protein solids you strain at the end of the process don’t have anything left in them — neither taste nor texture or nutrients. All the goodness is now in the stock. The solids are to discard without any hesitation 🙂

  2. Phil

    Hello Katya!

    Thank you very much for this great ramen recipe. Can’t wait to try it out soon.

    I am trying to recreate tonkotsu ramen at home like the ones you would get in the ramen restaurants. Rich, creamy and deep flavour. I have been cooking my tonkotsu broth on a rolling boil for over 8 hours and I and I can see that the soup is getting the right colour.

    I tasted the soup but is is not really creamy and the flavour is still very light and not rich like in the restaurant where you can taste the richness on your first spoon.
    Is there a secret ingredient they put in which makes the rich creaminess and intense flavour? Or do I just use the wrong parts of the bone ( pigs trotter only) and cook it wrong?
    And do I have to boil it for 8 hours with lid on or lid off? I did it with lid off and just added water.

    Sorry to bombard you with so many questions 😉

    • lyukum

      Hi Phil,
      Thank you! If you make tori paitan, I’d appreciate your feedback. I am always curious how the same recipes work in different kitchens!

      About tonkotsu. I tasted it in Japan and obviously wanted to recreate it at home. It was 5 years ago. There were not many resources available online. I knew tonkotsu roots are in the ancient Chinese cream-stock and followed the recipe from Chinese Gastronomy (highly recommend it, btw!). The result was exactly as I liked it in Tokyo. My posting about it is in Russian, but 1) there are pictures to illustrate the process and ingredients, and 2) if you interested, I can email pages from the book with the recipe in English.

      To answer your questions relatively shortly — pig trotters are not enough. They give you the gelatinous texture, the thickness of the stock, but you are missing meat and bone marrow fat. Rolling boil does many things to the ingredients: fully extracts the flavors, emulsifies fat, helps to evaporate water and concentrate the stock. It means you start with more water but do the rapid boiling at the end with lid off.

      to make ~1 quart/1000ml of tonkotsu

      Ingredients from the book:
      1 ¼ lb. duck / 570g
      4 lb chicken / 1800-2000g
      ½ lb pork rib bones / 227-230g
      ¾ lb pork filet (tenderloin) / 340-350g
      3 spring onions (scallions)
      3 slices of ginger
      6 cups of water for the main stock / 1440g
      6 cups of cold rinse water / 1440g

      My list of ingredients:
      3 lb chicken / 1360g
      1 lb pork ribs / 450g
      1 1/2 lb pork fillet (tenderloin) / 680g
      1 lb veal marrow bones / 450g
      3 spring onions (scallions)
      3 slices of ginger
      6 cups of water for the main stock / 1440g
      6 cups of cold rinse water / 1440g

  3. Gilang

    How many liters do you use in this recipe.. and how many liters the last result of broth??

    • lyukum

      Water is not measured. You add enough water to extract flavor/fat/proteins/etc., and then cook the extraction down to concentrate and thicken it. What matters is the amount of chicken. You need ~1 1/4 – 1 1/2 kg of chicken (bones, cartilage, and meat) to make ~1 liter of stock.

  4. Amanda

    This recipe was amazing! I used 1 whole chicken (cheaper, plus I read that the spine is good for stock flavor) + 1.5 lb chicken feet and split it between 2 smaller pots (I didn’t have a large stock pot) – it made enough for 8 people. Everyone loved it. It was thick and delicious just like I hoped 🙂 I will definitely make it again.

  5. Amanda

    Hi there. Thanks or this recipe! I can’t seem to find the ingredient kon bucha powder anywhere. Do you have a link for it somewhere?

    • lyukum

      Here is kombu cha aka konbu cha on amazon. Where are you located? If you are in Austin, TX, kombu cha is available in Asahi Imports on Burnet and H Mart/Ranch 99 stores. Kombu cha is dry kelp (konbu/kombu) powder mixed with a moderate amount of fine sea salt. It’s an easier way to add seaweed flavor to the dish, but in many cases can be replaced with a chopped reconstituted dry kelp, if not available.

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