January 12, 2015 lyukum

Okonomiyaki, Osaka Style

Okonomiyaki Osaka Style
Aonori, tenkatsu, and katsuobusi

Aonori, tenkatsu, and katsuobusi


Nagaimo

Nagaimo


Okonomiyaki Osaka Style

Okonomiyaki Osaka Style


I enjoy blogging and sharing recipes online, but telling stories about food and cooking it for my guests at the same time is much more fun. It involves all the senses. I like to start with a field trip to the Asian stores, point to my favorite ingredients, and explain why. We shop for everything needed for the recipe, so after the demo my guests are ready to cook the same dish at home.

I chose okonomiyaki for my free demos for a reason. Many people see the ingredients and either can’t imagine the result or suspect they won’t like it. The first bite is always a pleasant surprise. Some say they would never guess what okonomiyaki is made of.

Okonomiyaki is a Japanese pancake made of shredded cabbage mixed with a variety of ingredients and some batter. Cooked okonomiyaki is served with okonomi sauce, Japanese mayonnaise, katsuobushi, and aonori. All these components are important.

Okonomiyaki originated from the Osaka and Hiroshima areas (West) of Japan. The name means “what you like, grilled”. Okonomi means “what you want” or “what you like”, yaki means “grilled” or “cooked”. There is no one way to make Okonomiyaki and no one recipe that defines it — it is very much up to the chef or customer. Osaka style, when all the ingredients are mixed and cooked together, is my favorite.

Read more about the history of the dish, its variations and recipes: http://okonomiyakiworld.com

Osaka Style Okonomiyaki
Print Recipe
Prep Time 25minutes
Cook Time 15minutes
Passive Time 15minutes
Servings portions
Print Recipe
Prep Time 25minutes
Cook Time 15minutes
Passive Time 15minutes
Servings portions
Ingredients
Units:
main ingredients
for batter
for frying
for toppings
Ingredients
Units:
main ingredients
for batter
for frying
for toppings
Instructions
  1. Finely dice cabbage, mince pickled ginger and scallions, grate nagaimo, make dashi.
  2. Place in a bowl cabbage, pickled ginger, scallions, nagaimo, dashi, dry shrimp,and eggs.
  3. Mix well.
  4. Add flour and mix.
  5. Add tenkasu. Don't mix untill frying pan is ready! Place a large diameter frying pan on medium heat. Add oil and bring it to almost smoking.
  6. Lower the heat. Mix the batter.
  7. Spoon 3 portions of the mixture on the pan. Fry pancakes on medium low heat, covered, for about 5 minutes.
  8. Flip them to fry on the other side, when they appear dry on the top. Fry them on the other side not covered for another 2-3 minutes, until golden brown.
  9. Serve okonomiyaki hot with sauces and toppings.
Recipe Notes

You can make dashi from scratch or mix instant hon dashi granules with hot water (1 tsp hon dashi + 3/4 cup water). Nagaimo can be substituted with 1 tbsp of tapioca flour mixed with 1/4 cup of boiling hot water. Nagaimo and tenkasu make okonomiyaki texture light and fluffy. Do not omit them. Both these ingredients and aonory can be found in Asahi Imports store in Austin.

Окономияки в стиле Осаки

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Nutrition Facts
Osaka Style Okonomiyaki
Amount Per Serving
Calories 242 Calories from Fat 126
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 14g 22%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Polyunsaturated Fat 6g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 126mg 42%
Sodium 420mg 18%
Potassium 176mg 5%
Total Carbohydrates 21g 7%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 4g
Protein 9g 18%
Vitamin A 7%
Vitamin C 29%
Calcium 6%
Iron 7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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Comments (3)

  1. Tanya M

    Nagaimo has a very interesting texture when grated. Reminds me of ocean peppers.
    I have not had any luck with tempura scraps. Will panco bread crumbs work?

    • lyukum

      Ocean peppers? I’ve never heard of them. Googling didn’t help. What are they?
      If I’d want to compare the texture of grated nagaimo to something familiar, I’d choose grated aloe vera.

      What do you mean by “no luck”? You couldn’t find it? No, panco can’t substitute tenkasu. I haven’t tried it, but I think tiny rice or corn puffs could work. Tenkasu affect the texture. They are airy solid foam, and by mixing them into the okonomiyaki mixture at the last moment you add lightness and fluffiness to the final cabbage pancake. Nagaimo’s function is partially the same. It is a binding ingredient, but it makes the whole mix drier and lighter when cooked.

      That’s how tenkasu should look like: http://www.amazon.com/Otafuku-Tenkasu-120g/dp/B004HVLW14

      Unfortunately, on amazon they are expensive beyond any reason. I buy the same amount of tenkasu for $2-3 in Austin, in Asahi Imports. If you can’t find reasonably priced tenkasu, make them. I’d buy a tempura mix and use it for making scraps. And I’d make them the same way as spätzle — “straining” the batter (tempura mix + ice cold water) through a strainer with holes (not sieve) into hot oil.

      • Tanya M

        Autocorrect has created a new vegetable! I meant okra peppers. They are very slimy, just like nagaimo.
        I will have to explore Asian grocery stores in Minneapolis. I have seen plain corn puffs in regular supermarkets, they may have to do in a pinch.
        Thank you for the reply!

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