September 8, 2018 lyukum

Kamo Nanban Soba | Buckwheat Noodles Soup with Duck Breast and Scallions

Kamo Nanban Soba

Kamo

I found a reliable source of wonderful buckwheat flour for a fresh homemade soba and started exploring traditional recipes with fresh noodles. Duck is one of my favorite ingredients, and Kamo Nanban Soba became one of the most repeated summer soups in my kitchen. This dish can be made with duck tsukune (meatballs) and/or seared and thinly sliced duck breast. Duck meatballs should be pre-cooked, and they are the best when grilled. I prefer duck breast in this dish. One breast is enough for two portions. It takes time to render fat from its skin, so it makes sense to start doing it while making buckwheat noodles. The rest is simple — baste the breasts with hot rendered duck fat until 80% cooked, let rest and cool, keep refrigerated until ready to serve the soup. Thinly sliced and arranged on top of the soba in a bowl, the duck is cooked to complete doneness with steaming hot stock poured right over it.

Nanban

This soup is usually served with thinly sliced negi, Japanese leeks (or etymologically — nanban, onions). Since negi is not always handy, I substitute it with scallions. Thin slices of watermelon radish add some crunchy texture and make the presentation more attractive.

Mentsuyu

Mentsuyu is a basic noodle soup broth essential in both hot and cold udon, soba, somen, and ramen dishes. On its own it’s used as a dipping sauce for cold noodles, when diluted down a little it’s used for noodle soup. The flavoring base of mentsuyu is kaeshi, a cooked-down mixture of three high-quality ingredients — soy sauce, sugar, and mirin.

Kamo Nanban Soba | Buckwheat Noodles Soup with Duck Breast and Scallions
Kamo Nanban Soba, Duck Breast
Print Recipe
Prep Time 1hour
Cook Time 5minutes
Servings servings
Kamo Nanban Soba, Duck Breast
Print Recipe
Prep Time 1hour
Cook Time 5minutes
Servings servings
Ingredients
Units:
for kaeshi
for the soup
Ingredients
Units:
for kaeshi
for the soup
Instructions
for kaeshi
  1. In a small saucepan, add soy sauce, mirin, and sugar and bring to a boil. Let simmer over medium heat for 5 minutes. Pour hot into a clean glass jar and close with a lid. Store refrigerated for up to 5 months.
for the soup
  1. To prepare the hot soba broth, add the dashi, kaeshi, and mirin to a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  2. Score the duck’s skin. Season with salt on both sides, place it skin-side down on a cold dry skillet and slowly render the fat over low heat, for about 25-30 min. When the skin is golden and crispy, baste the duck with hot fat for another 5-10 minutes to cook rare (115F inner temp). Remove from heat and let rest skin-side up.
  3. Discard the fat and return the skillet to the heat. If using, add negi and saute until it caramelizes slightly, and set aside.
  4. Slice the duck breasts 1/8" thin and set aside, covered to prevent drying. Steps 1-4 can be made in advance and, in that case, all components of the dish should be stored refrigerated until ready to serve.
  5. Cook the soba and drain it in a colander. If not serving immediately, cool the soba in a cold bath and reheat just before eating by dipping a strainer with noodles into boiling stock for a few seconds.
  6. In a pot, bring the soba broth to boiling. Divide the soba noodles among warmed bowls. Arrange the duck slices and negi over the soba and watermelon slices on the side of the bowl. Pour boiling broth over the duck slices. Garnish each bowl with about 1 tbsp sliced scallions and 0.5-1 tsp wasabi. Season with shichimi togarashi to taste.
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Tagged: , , , ,

LOVE YOUR COOKING

Culinary coach and personal chef with extensive knowledge of cuisines from cultures around the world. I invite you into my cooking lab to share my discoveries.
#LYcooking #lyukumcookinglab

new recipes
in your inbox

Subscribe to Lyukum Cooking Lab mailing list to get updates to online recipe collection to your email inbox.