Khashlama

Khashlama

I prefer slowly cooked beef shanks for plain khashlama and leg of lamb for festive version. A slow cooker/crock pot is the most convenient device to make this dish. Otherwise, assemble vegetables and meat layers in an iron pot, start on the stove to bring water to boiling and finish in the 300F oven by slowly cooking for another 3-4 hours. There is also a version when meat is cooked first; then it is layered with vegetables in small ceramic or clay pots and cooked in the oven to serve khashlama individually portioned. In this case, it only takes 1-1.5 hours in the oven — just to cook vegetables.

Read more

Chicken Liver Pâté | Terrine de Foies de Volaille

Chicken Liver Pate

This recipe is classic French/European recipe for chicken liver pate, except for the first step with soaking livers in starchy ice bath. Most recipes include soaking livers in milk. “It is often said that milk improves the taste, purges blood, lightens the color, or affects some other property of the meat.” (“Modernist Cuisine” (Nathan Myhrvold, p. 147) Soaking lean proteins in cold water (or flavored liquids) mixed with starch is “velveting”, a technique used to prevent delicate foods from overcooking. I’ve heard about it first from my Japanese friend and then found more in Chinese Gastronomy by Hsiang Ju Lin and Tsuifeng Lin.

Read more

Poultry Hearts and Gizzards Confit

Duck Gizzards Confit

Oh, this dish sounds so romantic in French — Gésiers de Canard Confit — duck gizzards, slowly cooked in duck fat. When cooked confit, strong muscle of gizzard becomes a soft and plump morsel, full of flavor, with a hint of gaminess. Gésiers de canard confit is a specialty in South West France that pleasantly surprises many tourists who try it for the first time. Gésiers are respected ingredient in a variety of warm salads, including famous Landaise salad. They are gently fried in a little duck fat before serving. They are also very good with buckwheat, roasted potatoes, or sautéed winter squashes.

Read more

Caouane. Creole Turtle Soup

Creole Turtle Soup/Stew

For English-speaking people it might sound like “cow Ann.” So, there. It’s meat, it tastes good. If tasting blind, I wouldn’t be able to say what kind, but I’d suspect slow-cooked tough lean beef muscles or some kind of beef offal.

I was going for thick and rich Creole turtle stew. A cup of sauce left over and cooked Angus beef meatballs in it. You don’t need exotic for Texas turtle meat to enjoy this Creole creation! Cook this stew with easily available beef shanks or cheeks. This dish is perfect for cold weather.

Read more

LET'S COOK TOGETHER!

#LYcooking #lyukumcookinglab

new recipes
in your inbox

Subscribe to Lyukum Cooking Lab mailing list to get updates to online recipe collection to your email inbox.